Book Review: Lesser Known Monsters

“Being the chosen one isn’t always a good thing.”

Stories of heroes and monsters have been passed down since we were able to make fires to share stories around. They enthrall us in their grandeur, shock us with their intensity, terrorize us with the horror that lurks within the shadows. But ultimately, the heroic protagonist, through virtue of their strength and ingenuity, arises victorious.

This is not one of those stories.

Lesser Known Monsters by Rory Michaelson is a dark, queer fantasy debut that balances an intriguing plot, striking and diverse characters, and a whirlwind gay romance all on the backs of a protagonist that is endearingly… average.

Oscar Turndale knows what it’s like to be left behind. Abandoned by his parents at a young age, he immediately empathizes when a young girl is brought into his ward at the hospital with severe injuries and no parental figure in sight. When the girl points to a fellow colleague and not-quite-ex-boyfriend as the culprit, Oscar and his friends Zara and Marcus quickly find themselves in over their heads when their search turns to the supernatural.

The Good:

What really kept me on the edge of my seat was that I genuinely cared about the characters. The problem with a lot of plot-driven stories is that the characters are often underdeveloped, cardboard cutouts that the writer knows does well to serve a certain purpose. They’re tried and true caricatures of real people, created to fulfill a need. This is partially why a lot of authors rely on stereotypes—because they know how the audience will react to those stereotypes.

Michaelson’s characters were unique. They were vivid, nuanced, driven by their own wants and needs. They peeled themselves off the page and became real in my mind, not in spite of their uniqueness but because of it. They were diverse, and fully embraced that diversity.

The plot itself was intriguing. I loved the idea of an ‘average’ hero, one who makes mistakes with very real consequences and relies on the strength of their found family to get them through. The format was very well crafted, with monster profiles and interludes that all intertwined into a narrative that was intelligent while still relying on the inherent fantastical elements.

Should You Read It?:

As always, please consider the Trigger Warnings in the section below if you have any triggers that may be a concern when reading.

We talk a lot about Own Voices in the writing community—that is, books written by the minority that is represented within the book. This particular novel is considered Own Voices in regards to queer representation, and it shows. There’s just about every letter in LGBTQ represented, and not in passing either; not only are the identities present, but they thrive. You can often tell when a character is put in a story where their identity becomes the character, but Oscar, Zara and Marcus are all fully formed in their own right. If you’re looking for a supernatural or modern fantasy book with queer representation, Lesser Known Monsters would be a fantastic pick.

And at the end of the day, off all the books I’ve read for my book reviews, this has been one of the most fun. Even though there was tension, mystery, and heartbreak, it didn’t overwhelm and it wasn’t overdone. I realize that’s not the most measurable or explainable of merits, but I simply enjoyed reading it. 

Trigger Warnings: Genre Consistent Gore, Implied Sexual Situations

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